#HowTo make a photobooth / Part 7 And more laser cutting…

#HowTo make a photobooth / Part 7 And more laser cutting…

Previous posts here:

Part 1: #HowTo make a photobooth with i.MX processor based Utilite and Wandboard, Freedom KL25Z board
Part 2: #HowTo make a photobooth / Part 2 The new starting point
Part 3: #HowTo make a photobooth / Part 3 The new remote display
Part 4: #HowTo make a photobooth / Part 4 More slideshow and the photo booth script
Part 5: #HowTo make a photobooth / Part 5 Building a better button box
Part 6: #HowTo make a photobooth / Part 6 Cron job, uploading, emailing and laser cutting

Pretty much all of the software pieces are in place. The most recent focus has been on the physicals of the kiosk. The pillar that holds the TVs can be seen in a previous post.

The new pieces below are for displaying the boards that make the kiosk run. They sit atop the pillar. As can be seen further below, the boards will sit between the backs of the two TVs.

These shapes were generated by first drawing a 7x7x2 inch box with http://makercase.com. After the laser cut SVG file was downloaded, I used Inkscape to leave only the fingered joints on the two sides and modified one of the 2×7 faces so that the 7×7 face would be at a 45 degree from the horizontal. The sides are glued to the 7×7 faces with a 1/2 in square piece of hardwood. No screws were used for these joints since they are low stress joint. The pillar was screwed but I may still disassemble it and glue the joints for added strength.

blog7image1 blog7image2 blog7image3 blog7image4 blog7image5 blog7image6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 David DiCarlo is a hardware applications engineer for Freescale i.MX applications processors.

David DiCarlo
David DiCarlo
The human analog of a Swiss Army knife, David DiCarlo has been by providing hardware systems support for the past 17 years for the i.MX family of applications processors and audio digital signal processors, enabling customers to bring their products to market. Formally schooled as a material scientist (ceramics in particular), he plays an engineer by day and maker/re-maker the rest of the time.

Comments are closed.

Buy now